Drones – Meai Modelisme http://meai-modelisme.com/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 15:00:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://meai-modelisme.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Drones – Meai Modelisme http://meai-modelisme.com/ 32 32 In his new drone photography book, Caleb Kenna rediscovers Vermont from above | Books | Seven days https://meai-modelisme.com/in-his-new-drone-photography-book-caleb-kenna-rediscovers-vermont-from-above-books-seven-days/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 15:00:27 +0000 https://meai-modelisme.com/in-his-new-drone-photography-book-caleb-kenna-rediscovers-vermont-from-above-books-seven-days/ At first glance, the long shadows cast by apple crates in the snow resemble a purple cityscape, and the solar panels evoke a huge duvet. Drone photography in Caleb Kenna’s new book, Art from above Vermont, published in October, is an invitation to let the eyes play and the imagination wander. It is also an […]]]>

At first glance, the long shadows cast by apple crates in the snow resemble a purple cityscape, and the solar panels evoke a huge duvet. Drone photography in Caleb Kenna’s new book, Art from above Vermont, published in October, is an invitation to let the eyes play and the imagination wander. It is also an amazing reminder of the beauty and value of the Green Mountain State.

In 130 color photographs of everything from farmland and forests to quarries and roads, Middlebury-based Kenna invites viewers to see the state again from a bird’s eye view. Taken between 50 and 400 feet above the ground, his shots are funny, clever and stunning. Nordic skiers, so small they look like colorful commas, make a huge bloom in snowy Middlebury with their tracks; a field of dandelions in Whiting looks like wet green velvet; the roundabout near Middlebury College is a graceful abstraction of textures, colors and lines.

“I think Vermonters generally love the beauty of this place, but they’ve never seen it like this,” Bill McKibben said. Seven days by email. The conservationist, author and journalist, who wrote the foreword to the book, called Art from above Vermont “an extraordinary gift.”

Click to enlarge

  • Courtesy of Caleb Kenna
  • Middlebury

Kenna’s skills with drones allow us to “see the place we love from a new perspective,” McKibben wrote. “And her eye is flawless – the organic and the artificial intertwine in such lovely patterns.

“A certain type of Vermont photography has become a bit cliché. It will open everyone’s eyes again.”

The pair met when Kenna photographed McKibben for a 2010 Sierra magazine story. A longtime admirer of McKibben’s journalism and activism, Kenna invited him to write the foreword because he believed an Earth Defender would grasp the significance of his photos.

“When shooting landscapes in Vermont,” Kenna noted, “you can’t help but be influenced by the environment and climate change.”

Ultimately, however, Kenna shoots for the fun and the discoveries he makes along the way. Married with an 8-year-old son, the professional photographer and Federal Aviation Administration-certified drone pilot says taking pictures almost every day is meditative and calming. It provides a break from the daily chores and responsibilities of life, and it enjoys the “rush to come back with what you think are good pictures”. He mostly shoots about an hour’s drive from Middlebury, often in the same places in different seasons, so he’s trained to watch subtle changes closely.

Kenna is primarily inspired by the works of 20th century American photographers Alfred Stieglitz and Minor White, who convinced the art world of the merits of photography and found elegance and meaning in the everyday. Of the objects in his own works, Kenna said, “Yes, they are trees. Yes, they are hay bales. But I hope…they become something more through the photos.. .maybe a metaphor for something.”

Kenna’s photos are currently on display in local galleries, including that of the University of Vermont Medical Center, and he provides drone photography to many clients. But the general public got their first glimpse of his works in a 2020 New York Times Photo documentary. The colorful spread led to a book deal with Schiffer Publishing, and the Time printed a second photo essay of Kenna in 2022. On Sunday, Art from above Vermont was on the newspaper’s “What to Read” list.

Click to enlarge
Brandon - COURTESY OF CALEB KENNA

  • Courtesy of Caleb Kenna
  • Brandon

On tour to promote her book, Kenna will present a slideshow and drone video on Thursday, Dec. 1 at the Vermont Hotel in Burlington. He will also be hosting a sale of limited edition prints on Saturday, December 10 at his Brandon studio and online. Prices range from $300 for a 17 by 22 inch print to $700 for a 30 by 40 inch print.

Kenna films with a DJI Mavic 3 drone: a quadcopter (meaning it has four propellers) with a Hasselblad lens. It can run for about 45 minutes on a single battery charge and fly almost nine and a half miles from its operator.

A digital screen on the remote allows Kenna to see everything the drone sees. The best moments are when the drone’s vantage point shows it something completely unexpected, like a barn otherwise obscured by a high cornfield.

“These aerial discoveries are the most fun,” Kenna said, “where you put him looking for one thing and you see something else.”

Disclosure: Seven days regularly hires Caleb Kenna as a freelance photographer.

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Peter Rhodes on Arresting Journalists, Downing Drones and a Long Line of Former Prime Ministers https://meai-modelisme.com/peter-rhodes-on-arresting-journalists-downing-drones-and-a-long-line-of-former-prime-ministers/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 06:00:30 +0000 https://meai-modelisme.com/peter-rhodes-on-arresting-journalists-downing-drones-and-a-long-line-of-former-prime-ministers/ Former prime ministers on Remembrance Sunday program Liz Truss looked oddly empty in the line-up. It was probably not the Remembrance Sunday she had expected. Tony Blair, not yet 70, looked simply old. The arrest by Hertfordshire Police of three journalists covering a Just Stop Oil demonstration on the M25 is chilling enough. But what […]]]>
Former prime ministers on Remembrance Sunday program

Liz Truss looked oddly empty in the line-up. It was probably not the Remembrance Sunday she had expected. Tony Blair, not yet 70, looked simply old.

The arrest by Hertfordshire Police of three journalists covering a Just Stop Oil demonstration on the M25 is chilling enough. But what makes matters more sinister is the response from local conservative police and crime commissioner David Lloyd. He told the BBC: ‘The reason Just Stop Oil continues to do this is that they know they will get publicity if they do.

In other words, one official, elected “to hold the police and the police chief to account on behalf of the public,” seems to think that editorial decisions should be made by the police. Lloyd’s words clearly rocked Downing Street where a spokesman insisted it was vital journalists could ‘do their jobs freely without restriction’. Lloyd himself has issued a half-baked apology for the arrests and says, “I’m a big fan of a free press.” Yes indeed.

Anyway, glad it’s fixed. So, in the future, will reporters and photographers covering protests not be treated like criminals? Don’t put money on it.

In the 1930s, the development of radar was spurred on by the hope that it might prove to be a deadly ray, capable of knocking enemy bombers out of the sky. It didn’t happen, but 90 years later Britain’s first-ever laser weapon scored its first “kill”. In testing, the £100m DragonFire prototype is said to have destroyed a drone over two miles away.

The good news for our armed forces is that DragonFire doesn’t need shells or any other type of ammunition. The bad news is that each laser shot requires an enormous amount of electricity. Imagine the scenario. An enemy drone is sent to destroy the UK’s national grid and put out all our lights. DragonFire destroys the drone – but all our lights go out.

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bsf: drones across the Pakistani border more than doubled in 2022 : BSF DG https://meai-modelisme.com/bsf-drones-across-the-pakistani-border-more-than-doubled-in-2022-bsf-dg/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 18:46:00 +0000 https://meai-modelisme.com/bsf-drones-across-the-pakistani-border-more-than-doubled-in-2022-bsf-dg/ Instances of drones bringing drugs, arms and ammunition along the borders of Punjab and Jammu from all over Pakistan have more than doubled in 2022 and the BSF is seeking a foolproof solution to control this threat, the director said on Saturday. General of the Force, Pankaj Kumar Singh. The BSF chief said the force […]]]>
Instances of drones bringing drugs, arms and ammunition along the borders of Punjab and Jammu from all over Pakistan have more than doubled in 2022 and the BSF is seeking a foolproof solution to control this threat, the director said on Saturday. General of the Force, Pankaj Kumar Singh. The BSF chief said the force had recently established a state-of-the-art lab at a camp in Delhi to study drone forensics and the results were very encouraging.

Security agencies could track the flight path and even the address of criminals involved in this cross-border illegal activity that has been surging in recent years, he said.

Singh said the force had been “bombarded” by the onslaught of drone flights across the Pakistani border on the western front.

“The BSF has been a target of the drone threat for some time…the versatility of the drone, which is well known, causes us problems with nefarious elements having found new uses for the drone due to its anonymity and its fast flight at a sufficient height around borders,” he said.

The DG said this when briefing Union Home Secretary Ajay Kumar Bhalla who was chairing an event to inaugurate the forensic laboratory through a webinar session.

Quantifying the enormity of the drone threat, the DG said that while the BSF detected around 79 drone flights along the Indo-Pakistan international border in 2020, it rose to 109 last year and “has more than doubled to 266 this year”.

“The main culprit areas are Punjab, which has seen 215 thefts this year… in Jammu, about 22 thefts have been seen,” Singh said.

“The problem is serious. We don’t have a foolproof solution at the moment. They (the drones) brought narcotics, weapons and ammunition, counterfeit money and all kinds of things,” he said. he declares.

The DG said that initially the BSF struggled with the challenge of not knowing what to do and even when the drone went down they had “no idea” where it came from or was going.

“We then started to get into the forensic part. We realized that these drones had chips similar to computing devices like computers and cell phones. As digital forensics helps solve cybercrimes, we also got answers here,” Singh said.

The BSF, responsible for protecting more than 3,000 km of the Indo-Pakistan international border crossing Gujarat, Rajasthan, Punjab and Jammu, first established a drone repair laboratory in Delhi in September this year. last, then enhanced it in October to analyze the forensics of drones shot down or recovered by it, the Punjab Police and the Narcotics Control Bureau.

He spent around Rs 50 lakh to establish this forensic laboratory and deployed a select workforce of tech-savvy officers and staff to operate it.

“We found (after forensic analysis of the drones) their flight paths, launch and landing points, timings, GPS (global positioning system) coordinates and even the messages they exchanged and we realized there was a wealth of information, if we could get into this topic we could find addresses, locations of suspects and much more,” Singh said.

He said the force had developed “good coordination” with the Punjab police on the issue, which also provided the BSF with 200 personnel to carry out “deep patrols” on the frontline to check for drones and their droppings.

Citing a success story, where drone drops happened in the Havelia region of Punjab in March, the DG said a joint investigation and action by the two security agencies led to the arrest of 8 people , six of whom were convicted of drug trafficking.

The DG said the force had now launched a new system of incentives and cash rewards for its border teams who shoot down drones.

“Eleven drones have been shot down (by us) this year and we give very nice rewards to the teams that shoot them down. There is a very good enthusiasm in these teams,” he said.

The BSF chief said the force was now undertaking a two-pronged approach to controlling this threat.

“We undertake deep patrols so that people cannot come to the border to pick up drone droppings. We dig deep into drone forensics to extract information about its senders and recipients,” he said. declared.

The problem is “so acute” and, “what we know from interrogation (of suspects and apprehends) that wherever our drone teams are deployed…deep patrols or anti-drone equipment are installed , the criminals go elsewhere to undertake the illegal activity,” the DG said.

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Fighting reforestation with drones and AI https://meai-modelisme.com/fighting-reforestation-with-drones-and-ai/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 04:56:14 +0000 https://meai-modelisme.com/fighting-reforestation-with-drones-and-ai/ “Crowdfunding has helped us raise awareness and invite people to support us – our slogan is ‘Join our mission: restore the planet’,” says Walker. “It also helped us grow our team and leverage partnerships with academic institutions, but the latest round of funding was fundamental to advancing our biotech to a point where we are […]]]>

“Crowdfunding has helped us raise awareness and invite people to support us – our slogan is ‘Join our mission: restore the planet’,” says Walker.

“It also helped us grow our team and leverage partnerships with academic institutions, but the latest round of funding was fundamental to advancing our biotech to a point where we are now poised to scale.”

Today, AirSeed projects include collaborations with landowners and businesses on large-scale projects, with reforestation plays an essential role in carbon credit systems.

He recently joined forces with Telstra on a tech trial to plant and manage the reforestation of 240ha of land in Yarrowyck in northern New South Wales to help offset the telecom operator’s carbon emissions. The project includes the planting of 158,000 native trees and shrubs, which are expected to store approximately 160,000 t of carbon dioxide over the next 25 years.

Restore biodiversity

AirSeed Technologies uses a combination of artificial intelligence and GPS technology to plant 40,000 seeds per drone per day.

Machine learning technology allows the drone to optimize planting by matching certain species to their ideal typography, irrigation conditions and soil health.

Louw explains that pre- and post-plant analysis is a key part of the AirSeed solution.

“Using remote sensing, our proprietary software and machine learning algorithms, we are able to identify the best places to plant specific species while also identifying where not to plant, such as rivers, roads, fallen trees and depressions in the ground which may indicate noxious weeds.

Pieter Van Zyl (left) and Andries Louw (right).

Once these factors are identified, AirSeed’s software creates a flight path and tells the drone where to plant certain species in certain locations.

“Each drone in a flight can plant up to 16 different species, which is a key part of the process, and a big part of our business is making the seed pods and the technology behind it,” says Walker.

AirSeed’s pod technology represents the majority of its intellectual property.

“We use different types of organic components that are great for retaining water and different types of microbial communities that we put inside the pod, such as probiotics, which help support the seed once it germinates, as well as different types of nutrients and minerals,” he says.

“It’s a way to stimulate growth at an early stage and reduce susceptibility to things like ants and other types of insects, for example, that could potentially damage or kill the plant once it gets started. has reached a certain size.”

AirSeed drones also record the GPS location of each seed pod planted for easy monitoring and surveying.

“We don’t just plant and then walk away,” says Walker. “We commit to a project for typically up to three years and use remote sensing data to process the algorithms that tell us where we’ve planted and what’s growing and where there are invasive weeds because the weed load is one of the main causes of failure.

When invasive weeds are detected, AirSeed’s technology can identify the variety and type of pesticide to be delivered at specific volumes.

“Information about the low-toxic spot spray is transmitted to another drone that flies in and does the spraying,” Walker says.

Most young trees take at least five years to mature beyond the point of vulnerability to pests and predators. Walker says the success rate of AirSeed varies depending on the environment and plant species planted.

“Project types have their nuances, but 20-40% is our target ratio,” he says. “Seedlings grown in a nursery with people going out to dig a hole and plant them present an expensive and slow-scaling process, but it yields very high success rates of around 80 percent.

“Our goal has always been to strike a balance between creating technology, delivery systems, software and machine learning to facilitate scale and to focus on the science behind biotechnology to promote growth and early stage success rate.”

Replant the globe

the UN International Panel on Climate Change estimates that the world has only 10 years to prevent the most catastrophic effects of global warming. Global energy-related carbon dioxide emissions increased by 6% in 2021 at their highest level of 36.3 billion tonnes. While planting trees is currently the best way to sequester carbon, the scale of the challenge requires the planting of billions of trees each year.

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The sky is the limit: Co-op set to use drones to scatter ashes https://meai-modelisme.com/the-sky-is-the-limit-co-op-set-to-use-drones-to-scatter-ashes/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 11:46:39 +0000 https://meai-modelisme.com/the-sky-is-the-limit-co-op-set-to-use-drones-to-scatter-ashes/ November 07, 2022 First National Funeral Provider to Launch New Airborne Ash Scattering Service Bereaved families can now scatter ashes by drone in memorable locations on land and sea Option for family to attend and for service to be recorded More than a third (35%) of those who cremated a loved one in the past […]]]>

November 07, 2022

  • First National Funeral Provider to Launch New Airborne Ash Scattering Service
  • Bereaved families can now scatter ashes by drone in memorable locations on land and sea
  • Option for family to attend and for service to be recorded
  • More than a third (35%) of those who cremated a loved one in the past five years chose to scatter the ashes in a significant location

The UK’s leading funeral service provider, Co-op Funeralcare, is now offering customers the option of using a drone to scatter their loved one’s ashes. The new service, now available nationwide, will allow families to scatter ashes in special and memorable places on land and sea, including favorite beauty spots and sports grounds.

The service, which can be arranged through Co-op’s 800 funeral homes, is available to both customers who arranged the funeral with Co-op, as well as those who had the funeral elsewhere.

With 80% of families now opting for cremation over burial, and 35%** of people who have chosen cremation for their loved one choosing to scatter the ashes in a significant location, the launch is part of the new range of memorial options for a loved one’s ashes.

The service allows families to scatter ashes in hard-to-reach places such as the sea, over rivers or at sports fields and beauty spots. Families are fully supported to find a suitable space to scatter their loved one’s ashes with the assurance that all necessary permissions and conditions are in place to create a unique and special farewell.

Families will have the opportunity to attend the scattering with friends and family to make the occasion memorable. Moreover, they can also choose the option to register the service.

Speaking about the launch, Gill Stewart, MD of Co-op Funeralcare said“Our colleagues are dedicated to supporting the bereaved families we serve long after the funeral and the sky really is the limit now in terms of the choices available.

“Cremation has continued to grow rapidly as a choice for funerals. We are always looking for new and innovative ways to help families honor their loved ones, not only through the funeral service, but also through unique and personal memorial options for their ashes.

Experienced drone operator and former RAF pilot Chris Mace said: “Drones are increasingly seen as a way to deliver essential services in our society, and investment in creating drone highways is being considered as this use of technology expands.

“Using drones to provide new options for ash scattering is an emerging and unique way for this technology to deliver a truly memorable service. Ensuring the correct permissions are sought is critical and weather conditions must be favorable, but the use of a drone alleviates much of the worry when families want to scatter ashes in otherwise hard-to-reach places.

ENDS

Notes to Editors

__For media enquiries, please contact: __Lauren Pogson / 07966 672112 / pressoffice@coop.co.uk

Video available here to see the drones in action.

About research:
Based on Co-op business data
*YouGov fieldwork undertaken 28-31 October 2022. The total sample size was 2053 adults, of which 1030 UK adults have experienced bereavement of a loved one in the past 5 years. The survey was conducted online. Figures have been weighted and are representative of all UK adults (aged 18+).

About the cooperative:
Co-op is one of the largest consumer co-operatives in the world with interests in food, funerals, insurance and legal services. Owned by millions of UK consumers, the co-operative operates over 2,500 food shops, over 800 funeral homes and supplies products to over 5,000 other shops, including those run by independent co-operative societies and by the through its wholesale business, Nisa Retail Limited. Employing nearly 60,000 people, the co-operative has an annual turnover of over £11 billion and is a recognized leader in its social objectives and community-led programmes. The Coop exists to meet the needs of members and stand up for the things they believe in.

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Send Ukrainian C-RAMs and VAMPIREs to help defeat Iranian drones https://meai-modelisme.com/send-ukrainian-c-rams-and-vampires-to-help-defeat-iranian-drones/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 20:19:50 +0000 https://meai-modelisme.com/send-ukrainian-c-rams-and-vampires-to-help-defeat-iranian-drones/ A group of Shahed-136 drones supplied by Iran hit Kyiv on October 17, killing at least four people, including a woman who was in a residential building and six months pregnant. About a week earlier, a barrage of Russian cruise missiles destroyed at least five residential buildings, killing at least 13 people and injuring more […]]]>

A group of Shahed-136 drones supplied by Iran hit Kyiv on October 17, killing at least four people, including a woman who was in a residential building and six months pregnant. About a week earlier, a barrage of Russian cruise missiles destroyed at least five residential buildings, killing at least 13 people and injuring more than 87 others, including 10 children.

Moscow is using its remaining cruise missiles and recently acquired Iranian drones to destroy infrastructure such as electrical substations, increase political pressure on Kyiv and break the will of the Ukrainian people to resist the unprovoked Russian invasion.

The United States sends the National Advanced Surface-to-Air Missile System (NASAMS) to help Ukraine deal with the threat of cruise missiles, but these systems are not perfectly suited to deal with Russian attacks using drones supplied by Iran. To address the drone threat and protect the NASAMS once they arrive, Washington should expedite the delivery of VAMPIRE (Vehicle-Agnostic Modular Palletized ISR Rocket Equipment) systems and send Counter-Rocket, Artillery and Mortar (C-RAM) systems as a temporary solution.

The NASAMS, jointly developed by Raytheon and Kongsberg Defense and Aerospace of Norway, consists of an AN/MPQ-64 Sentinel radar, AIM-120 Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missiles (AMRAAM), a command center and a launcher. The first two NASAMS are now in the hands of the US government and Ukrainian troops are being trained in the use of the system. The two firing units are expected to arrive in Ukraine in the coming weeks. Another six units are expected to arrive in Ukraine next year (probably much later next year).

NASAMS provides a strong cruise missile defense capability (it helps protect Washington, DC against cruise missiles), but the system may struggle to counter Iranian Shahed-136 drones. This is due to the Iranian drones’ difficult combination of slow speed, low flight profile, limited radar section and ability to attack in swarms from multiple directions. These abilities could allow a group of Shaheds to overwhelm a single NASAMS. Even if the NASAMS was more effective against Iranian drones, it should be noted that the cost per AMRAAM of the NASAMS shots significantly exceeds the cost of one Shahed-136 drone (over 30 to 1).

So the Ukrainians need an inexpensive – and fast – counter-drone capability. Such a system could better protect key infrastructure and the NASAMS themselves. In fact, Ukrainian planners should plan to place counter-drone systems close to NASAMS firing units to avoid the disaster of a cheap Shahed drone destroying a newly arrived NASAMS due to insufficient protection. This is a technique that the United States has employed in the Middle East to protect its Patriot air and missile defense systems there.

The more than 1,400 Stinger anti-aircraft systems the United States has already provided may help, but we should expect to see more Iranian drones in use in Ukraine. For this reason, Washington should seek to send additional counter-drone capability to Kyiv.

The United States has two effective candidates, one in development and the other already in the field. Washington should send the two to Ukraine as soon as possible.

The VAMPIRE system consists of an electro-optical and infrared sensor ball (to detect the drone), a laser designator (to track the drone) and a four-shot 70mm short-range rocket launcher (to engage the drone) – all loaded into the back of a van. It is inexpensive at around $27,000 per round.

The problem with the VAMPIRE system is that a contract has not yet been awarded and is unlikely to arrive in Ukraine before May 2023, according to Pentagon press secretary Brig. General Pat Ryder. Meanwhile, Shahed-136 attacks continue and Ukraine needs additional help to immediately counter Iranian drones.

Congress would be wise to ask about the delays in finalizing the contract and what can be done to expedite the delivery of the VAMPIRE. In a moment, Congress should confirm that the maximum possible quantities are produced and sent.

In the meantime, the US Army’s C-RAM system can help. It is a derivative of the US Navy’s Phalanx close-in weapons system which is used to protect US Navy ships against cruise missiles and other threats. Over the past forty years, the Navy has purchased and used many of these systems. The military has purchased a total of 53 C-RAM systems by April 2022, primarily to protect US bases in the Middle East.

The system consists of a 20mm Gatling gun, integrated infrared and radar search and tracking systems, and electrical generators, all mounted on a trailer. Similar to VAMPIRE, its cost per engagement is a fraction of that of NASAMS. US Army C-RAM systems engaged and destroyed hundreds of enemy rockets and mortars in Iraq and Afghanistan and apparently shot down two incoming drones in Baghdad in January this year.

As Washington reduced its force structure in the Middle East, it was decided to halt C-RAM production. The military, however, can immediately supply 3 or 4 of its current C-RAM systems to Ukraine to help Kyiv deal with the drone threat until the VAMPIRE systems arrive. The military will need to procure more anti-drone systems to replace those sent to Ukraine and bolster existing US vulnerabilities, in an effort to ensure that US Central Command has sufficient systems in place to protect US troops when the next escalation will come from Tehran and its terror. proxies.

As the Kremlin steps up its Iranian cruise missile and drone attacks on the people of Ukraine, Americans can do more than just condemn the attacks. In addition to ensuring that Ukraine receives the full NASAMS allocation as soon as possible, the United States should also send the C-RAMS and VAMPIRE systems without delay. Together they can save Ukrainian lives and ultimately help defeat the unprovoked invasion of the Kremlin.

Retired US Navy Rear Admiral Mark Montgomery is the senior director of the Center for Cyber ​​and Technological Innovation at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies. Bradley Bowman is the senior director of the FDD’s Center on Military and Political Power.

Ryan Brobst, research analyst at FDD, contributed to this article.

Have an opinion?

This article is an Op-Ed and the opinions expressed are those of the authors. If you would like to respond or would like to submit your own editorial, please email Cary O’Reilly, C4ISRNET Senior Editor.

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Russian soldiers were unable to launch drones into the Ukrainian counteroffensive due to software installation https://meai-modelisme.com/russian-soldiers-were-unable-to-launch-drones-into-the-ukrainian-counteroffensive-due-to-software-installation/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 11:24:50 +0000 https://meai-modelisme.com/russian-soldiers-were-unable-to-launch-drones-into-the-ukrainian-counteroffensive-due-to-software-installation/ The Ukrainian army liberated the town of Balakliya in southeastern Kharkiv Oblast, Ukraine on September 11, 2022. (Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images) A new Reuters investigation sheds light on the dysfunctionality of Russia’s military occupation of Kharkiv. Notes from soldiers to their superiors show them begging for non-military grade drones. Once received, the drones […]]]>

The Ukrainian army liberated the town of Balakliya in southeastern Kharkiv Oblast, Ukraine on September 11, 2022. (Metin Aktas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images)

  • A new Reuters investigation sheds light on the dysfunctionality of Russia’s military occupation of Kharkiv.
  • Notes from soldiers to their superiors show them begging for non-military grade drones.
  • Once received, the drones were not ready to use as they needed the correct software first.
  • For more stories, visit Business Insider.

A Russian battalion in Balakliia, Kharkiv sent out calls for more drones in late July as Ukraine stepped up its eastern counteroffensive backed by US weapons, and some troops were eventually held back by a software installation, according to a new Reuters investigation.

A trove of thousands of military documents left behind by defeated Russian forces in Kharkiv, which withdrew in mid-September, and obtained by Reuters shed light on their brief regime of torture and later failing air capabilities.

Troops asked their superiors in Russia for more drones as Ukrainian forces relied increasingly and effectively on US HIMARS missile launchers in the summer before their counteroffensive in the north, according to Reuters.

“Quadcopters!!! Urgent!” a soldier wrote to his superior on July 19, according to Reuters. The quadcopter drones are not military grade, which gave a sign of the desperation of the troops before the Ukrainian counter-offensive. Drones are frequently used by Russia as they are low-cost, short-range rechargeable drones intended to launch small weapons. They are also used in part to offset the high costs of high-tech, explosive surveillance drones like Iran’s suicide bomber drones, according to The New York Times.

According to Reuters, the next day the forces received four Mavic-3 quadcopter drones, but they could not be used immediately when needed. The soldiers, under missile fire, had to install new software for the drones, then train 15 soldiers in their use.

Other notes from Reuters showed the soldiers begging for ammunition, with one soldier complaining that “the machine gun still won’t work if it doesn’t have bullets inside”.

The successful Ukrainian counter-offensive in northeast Kharkiv began in late summer and intensified in early September. By mid-September, towns like Balakliia and Izium had been liberated, and Russian leaders announced they were withdrawing from almost the entire Kharkiv region and transferring troops.

Russia had captured areas in the Kharkiv region from the early days of the war in late February, through the spring until Ukraine began pushing back. According to the Associated Press, at least 257 men, 225 women and 19 children have been killed by Russia during its occupation of the region.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said within days of the September counteroffensive, Ukraine had reclaimed more than 1,158 square miles of territory from Russian forces. Along with a solid military strategy and a steady flow of weapons, Ukraine said it had stepped up an offensive in the south as a disinformation tactic to surprise Russian troops in the northeast.

“[It] was a big disinformation special operation,” Taras Berezovets, Ukrainian special forces press officer told The Guardian. [our] the guys from Kharkiv received the best of Western, mainly American, weapons.

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Drone delivery is a thing now. But to what extent is it possible to have it everywhere, and would we even want it? https://meai-modelisme.com/drone-delivery-is-a-thing-now-but-to-what-extent-is-it-possible-to-have-it-everywhere-and-would-we-even-want-it/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 10:00:38 +0000 https://meai-modelisme.com/drone-delivery-is-a-thing-now-but-to-what-extent-is-it-possible-to-have-it-everywhere-and-would-we-even-want-it/ In recent years, cafes, supermarkets and online shops have started testing drone delivery in a handful of locations around the world. More than a dozen drone delivery companies are currently conducting such trials. Just this week, Wing (part of Google’s parent company Alphabet) announced a partnership with Australian supermarket giant Coles to deliver small items […]]]>

In recent years, cafes, supermarkets and online shops have started testing drone delivery in a handful of locations around the world. More than a dozen drone delivery companies are currently conducting such trials.

Just this week, Wing (part of Google’s parent company Alphabet) announced a partnership with Australian supermarket giant Coles to deliver small items by drone to customers near a Gold Coast supermarket. Wing already operates in parts of Canberra and Logan, Queensland.


Given the technical success of various trials so far, it is worth considering whether drone delivery could become mainstream and can actually be expanded geographically.

As you might expect, the answer is “it depends”. There are many issues when considering drones around people, such as security and infrastructure. For example, a recent crash of a delivery drone into power lines in a Logan suburb left thousands of people without power.

There is also potential unwanted noise and visual pollution, as well as a perceived issue around privacy.

Safety first

Adding potentially dozens of small planes to the skies over our homes, workplaces and roads every day is serious business. As you might hope, commercial drone operation is currently a highly regulated business in most countries.

In Australia, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority has strict regulations that aim to make the operation of drones as safe as possible. They too to forbid use of the drone if the device cannot be used safely in a given situation.

In fact, Australia was one of the first countries to have drone regulations. For example, you cannot fly a drone near an airport or directly above people.

Commercial drone operators are well aware of this and obtain a license to operate – it is in no one’s interest to operate in a dangerous way, and it would be bad for business.

A limited geographic market – for now

To meet the requirement to operate drones safely, delivery operators favor piloting drones over unpopulated terrain, typically very low-density areas, and especially the urban fringe. These are newer suburbs where drone flight paths can be planned to eliminate or minimize safety issues, such as an unexpected accident.

It’s no coincidence that Wing has conducted drone delivery trials in low-density areas of south-east Queensland and the outer suburbs of Canberra. These places are ideal for drone delivery and a great place to continue to develop this business, even if a bird attack can disrupt things.

But drone delivery in dense areas of big cities? This is very unlikely in the medium term, due to the extreme difficulty of operating drones safely in dense suburbs.

If you live in an apartment building, where will the delivery take place? On the roof? Perhaps, if your building has been fitted out for it. This is where scaling comes up against the biggest challenges, and the logistics of operating hundreds of drones from a distribution center get really difficult.

However, if there was a strong demand and the right investments were made, it is possible that drone delivery in dense urban areas could be achieved.

But just because it’s technically possible doesn’t mean will be occur. The long-term business case should make sense, of course. But there is a more critical short-term issue: the social license to operate.

A social license

A social license is not an official thing, a government body does not issue one. Rather, it is whether the general public accepts and supports the novelty.

Ultimately, this social acceptance is often what determines the success or failure of the widespread adoption of new technologies, such as delivery drones.

Take nuclear energy, for example. Many countries have nuclear power and the public seems happy with that. Other countries had a social license for nuclear power and lost it, like Japan. In Australia, we don’t have a social license for nuclear power, but that doesn’t mean we won’t get it in the future.

A social license is an ever-evolving construct based on the pros and cons of a technology, all of which are influenced by its perceived value. Most people now seem comfortable being tracked around the clock by their smartphones, as they believe the benefits outweigh the potential negative impacts.

It’s likely that we already have a strong social license to use drones to deliver life-saving emergency medicine to people in need. In a potential life or death situation like this, it’s easy to see that normally the benefits outweigh the risks or inconvenience to others.

But deliver a coffee or a tube of toothpaste by drone? I think the social license for this is up for grabs. At this point, it could go either way.

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Living wages, worms and drones help O’Neill Vintners & Distillers achieve B Corp status https://meai-modelisme.com/living-wages-worms-and-drones-help-oneill-vintners-distillers-achieve-b-corp-status/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://meai-modelisme.com/living-wages-worms-and-drones-help-oneill-vintners-distillers-achieve-b-corp-status/ Drone above vine vineyards AFP via Getty Images At O’Neill Vintners and Distillers, the 10e largest wine company in the United States, they care for a population of 150,000 million worms. The worms can recycle 80 million gallons of wastewater per year and are just one aspect of O’Neill’s sustainability practices that has helped them […]]]>

At O’Neill Vintners and Distillers, the 10e largest wine company in the United States, they care for a population of 150,000 million worms. The worms can recycle 80 million gallons of wastewater per year and are just one aspect of O’Neill’s sustainability practices that has helped them achieve B Corp status. Other components include a progressive human resources system focused on living wages and ongoing training for 360 employees, as well as in-vineyard drones that drop scale insect killers on vines as a natural method of scale insect control, instead of using pesticides.

“Since our inception in 2004,” says Jeff O’Neill, Founder and CEO, “we have always focused on sustainability. We were first BRC and ISO14001 certified, then we achieved California Sustainable Winekeeping certification in our vineyards and cellar. We have therefore staggered all these certifications and are now considering organic and regenerative certifications. After accomplishing the others, it was easier to apply for B Corp status, which took us 18 months to get.

To date, only 25 wineries worldwide have achieved B Corp status. Certification is stricter than others in that it not only assesses environmental and social practices within a company, but also holds companies accountable for the policies and practices of the community, suppliers, customers and corporate governance. Additionally, with an emphasis on transparency, it makes this information publicly available on B Corp’s website.

Given that O’Neill Vintners and Distillers produces around 2 million cases of wine and 2 million cases of spirits per year, that’s no small feat. O’Neill and CMO, Christine Moll, discuss the process and its benefits in a recent online interview.

Challenges and Benefits of Obtaining B Corp Certification

O’Neill’s best-known wine brands include Line 39, Harken, Intercept, Rabble and Robert Hall, but they also produce private labels for many stores, as well as large-scale wines and spirits. Based in Parlier, California, they own over 870 acres of vineyards statewide and source grapes from independent growers who operate over 15,000 acres of vineyards.

“One of the most challenging aspects of B Corp certification,” O’Neill reports, “is that all of our growers and other suppliers must also be certified as sustainable. This means they must have incorporated positive environmental and social practices into their business and proactively demonstrate improvements. O’Neill says getting that kind of buy-in wasn’t a slam dunk with everyone, but eventually they achieved that status.

Another key part of their success, says CMO Moll, “was identifying a team within the company to lead the B Corp certification process.” The audit process includes rigorous documentation of all aspects of certification and communication with multiple stakeholders to gather information and ensure everything is being implemented correctly.

The champions were Caine Thompson and Alyssa Hall. “It was a two-person team that worked with our winery and vineyard operations teams, as well as human resources, marketing, sales, suppliers and many other departments,” Moll reports. “In the end, all the hard work paid off, as our employees and sales force are really excited about getting B Corp certification. It is a force for good.

Another key benefit, according to O’Neill, is responding to the consumer trend for increased transparency in the wine industry. “New consumers want to appreciate wine and know what’s in it,” he says, “and younger consumers appreciate B Corporations.”

Some of the other US wineries that have achieved B Corp certification to date include: Ron Rubin Winery, Sokol Blosser, Fetzer-Bonterra, A to Z Wineworks, Winderlea, Patton Valley Vineyard, Stoller Family Estate, Chehalem Winery, Brooks Wineryand Bainbridge Vineyards.

How the wine industry can help change the game with regenerative agriculture

“I think the key question,” says O’Neill, “is how can we grow grapes in a more carbon-neutral environment? Part of the solution is to first become sustainable, but in the long run, I think embracing regenerative agriculture can be a game-changer. »

Regenerative agriculture focuses on soil health and includes the use of cover crops, reduced or no tillage, reduced or no use of agrochemicals, and building a common ecosystem with nature. Many large agricultural companies around the world are exploring this possibility, as it also reduces carbon emissions. The challenge is the cost of implementing new practices and adverse weather conditions, such as hot, humid weather that can stimulate mold growth and cause farmers to rush to spray agrochemicals.

“Climate change is real,” says O’Neill. “One of us alone won’t make a big difference, but together we can. The movement to make this happen is bigger than what it took for the world to end WWII – but We have achieved this. Now it is important that everyone understands what we are facing and that by working together we can solve this problem.

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Hard numbers: Ukraine strikes Iranian drones, Lula still in the lead, Japan needs stimulus, Chad bans opposition https://meai-modelisme.com/hard-numbers-ukraine-strikes-iranian-drones-lula-still-in-the-lead-japan-needs-stimulus-chad-bans-opposition/ Sun, 23 Oct 2022 18:02:33 +0000 https://meai-modelisme.com/hard-numbers-ukraine-strikes-iranian-drones-lula-still-in-the-lead-japan-needs-stimulus-chad-bans-opposition/ 70: The Ukrainian military has shot down 70% of Iranian-made drones launched by Russia since mid-September. Drones are one of the many reasons why the war is having an unexpected impact on Middle East politics. 4: With Brazil’s presidential run-off a week away, former President Lula da Silva is still four percentage points ahead of […]]]>

70: The Ukrainian military has shot down 70% of Iranian-made drones launched by Russia since mid-September. Drones are one of the many reasons why the war is having an unexpected impact on Middle East politics.


4: With Brazil’s presidential run-off a week away, former President Lula da Silva is still four percentage points ahead of incumbent President Jair Bolsonaro – who now says he will accept the result if nothing is wrong. bizarre happens, although many fear he will draw a 6 de Janeiro if he loses.

100 billion: A ruling party leader said Japan needed an economic stimulus of at least $100 billion to ease public pain from rising inflation. On Friday, the central bank stepped in to stabilize the yen for a second time amid growing pressure to eventually raise interest rates – and Prime Minister Fumio Kishida’s low approval rating.

seven: Chad has suspended seven opposition political parties after a crackdown on rare violent protests across the country turned deadly. Protesters resent that interim leader Mahamat Idriss Déby, son of Chad’s former strongman, plans to stay in power for two more years without confronting voters.

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